The Rose Valley Museum & Historical Society
| The Artists 1901 – 1911|
John Bisseger (1868-19??) was one of the many architects associated with the early Arts and Crafts community in Rose Valley. He attended Central High School in Philadelphia until 1885, the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Art from 1887-1889, and then the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts in 1890. He joined the T-Square Club in ‘89, and over the next decade distinguished himself by winning numerous local competitions for architectural sketches and drawings. In 1893-1894 he was a draftsman in the office of Frank L. and William L. Price, whom presumably he met while at the School of Industrial Art, and in ‘98-’99 worked with Edgar V. Seelor, another contemporary from that institution.

After a brief stint in Washington, D.C., Bissegger returned to Philadelphia and became the head draftsman in the office of Price and McLanahan. By 1905 he had moved to Rose Valley and was active in all areas of community life. He designed and built his house in the style of a chalet, a nod to his Swiss roots, and is known to have designed and built furniture.
J. Bisseger cabinet
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J. Bisseger cabinet made in 1907

Source: excerpted from Sandra L. Tatman, the Philadelphia Architects and Buildings Project
History of Rose Valley, Vol. 1
Woodcut Portrait by Francis Day Francis T. Day and his family arrived with William Price and his family in 1901. Day lived in one of the mill houses across from the Guest House. He was a portrait painter and illustrator and maintained a studio in Guild Hall. According to Nathan Kite in “Chronicles of the Folk” (Dec. 12, 1901), Day was “so deft in putting children on his canvas that the mothers all say when looking at [the] pictures, ‘it is the essence of the kid’” He, Carl DeMoll, Nathan Kite and Will Price drew up the charter for the Rose Valley Folk. He is reputed to have designed the Rose Valley Association seal of the rose and V.
Woodcut portrait by Francis Day
Francis Day painting of a Mill House
Francis Day painting in front of the Mill houses in 1902.

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1 Chronicles of the Folk, Dec. 1901

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Carl deMoll Carl deMoll (1871 - 1958) was an architect, engineer and illustrator and was part of the group of architects and artists who became involved with William L, Price in the Rose Valley arts and crafts community. Born in Philadelphia, de Moll was the son of Gustav de Moll (1843 - 1883) and Josephine Bower de Moll (1843 - 1934). Just 12 years old at the time of his father’s death, Carl left school to begin working at a number of jobs in order to support his mother and younger brother. He worked at a number of trades, including at one time the illustration of department store catalogs.

At the age of 17 Carl de Moll began his career in architecture working as a draftsman in the office of Frank L. and William L. Price. He served in the Price office until 1893 when he moved for two years to the office of Cope & Stewardson. From 1895 to 1897 he was a draftsman and assistant engineer with Frank Miles Day. At that firm, at the age of 24 Carl was assisting the chief engineer in calculating foundations, columns and beams and girders of a ten-story office building to be built at 1420 Chestnut Street in Philadelphia. Shortly after this period Carl experimented with a different career. Moving to New York, he tried his hand again at illustration, as well as working as a newspaperman. Returning then to Philadelphia he took a position with Price and McLanahan and remained there from 1897 to 1902. Among other projects with that firm he worked on the design of the Traymore Hotel in Atlantic City. In addition to handling the engineering on that project he was also in charge of the general engineering for the office.

Whether he met Will’s sister, Mary, while he was with Price and Price or with Price and McLanahan, is unclear, but they were married by 1901, and came with the earliest group to Rose Valley. For their home the young couple remodeled one of the three double mill houses on Rose Valley Road, turning the two houses into a single residence. Carl took up the trade of bookbinding, and produced a large and handsome notebook for the minutes of the Rose Valley Folk. However, the happy time in Rose Valley did not last. In the spring of 1902 Mary died with the birth of their son, Carl, Jr. and Carl returned with his little son and his mother to live again in Germantown. He would not remarry for another 14 years. Although he had left Rose Valley, Carl evidently kept in touch with the community and even as late as 1916 he is mentioned in a report of the Plastic Club on the occasion of an outing in Rose Valley. The event included a visit to Alice Barber Stephens’ studio, followed by a supper at another home and afterwards the guests, “enjoyed an Arabian play written by Mrs. Lewis Moor and read by Carl de Moll.”

From1902 to 1908 Carl de Moll worked as a draftsman, Assistant Engineer and Superintendent in the office of Horace Trumbauer in Philadelphia. For a brief period he attempted to establish his own office, presumably on the side, doing mostly engineering work. Finally in 1908 Carl went with the firm of Ballinger & Perrot, later to become The Ballinger Company. With that large architectural and engineering firm he finished out his career, working there for some 43 years to the age of 80, retiring as a partner in 1951. During World War I he even headed the firm’s staff of 125 in a New York office. Due to his particular interest in industrial processes and engineering, he was primarily responsible for the design of plants for American Viscose in Marcus Hook, Pennsylvania, and Virginia, as well as for plants for Atwater Kent in Philadelphia. Additional responsibilities included the design of many hospitals, including those at York, Chambersburg, Hanover and Chester, Pennsylvania.

In 1916 Carl married Mary Hitchner and in 1921 the couple relocated from Germantown to Swarthmore. They went on to have three children including Louis de Moll, who moved to Rose Valley with his wife and a daughter in 1950. Carl, Jr., the son born to Carl Senior’s first wife, Mary Price de Moll, as he grew up, spent a great deal of time visiting in Rose Valley. He was later married in the home of the Kites in Rose Valley, but died in an automobile accident in the mid-thirties.

Carl de Moll, in spite of having formal schooling only through sixth grade, supplemented by enrollment in night courses at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Design, was both a registered architect and registered engineer. He was a member of the American Society of Civil Engineers, the Philadelphia Sketch Club and the Art Club of Philadelphia. For many years he was a member and participated regularly in the Economics Group at Swarthmore College.

Source: Louis deMoll, 2003

Sketch by Mary Hitchner deMoll
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Mary Price Mary Louisa Price deMoll (1871-1902) Will’s youngest sister, studied painting at the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art. She had an interest in painting flowers. She was an avid gardener, and was put in charge of beautifying the landscape when the group first moved to Rose Valley. She died during the birth of her only child, Carl deMoll Jr. in 1902. The walnut trees on Old Mill Lane and the sycamore trees at the door of Hedgerow Theatre were planted as a memorial to her.

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

Mary Price Flower Painting
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Henry Hetzel came to Rose Valley in 1903. He and his wife, Mary, lived next door to William Price in a little house designed by Price as an example of “the home of the democrat”. He rented part of the Old Mill and set up a work shop for metal and wood, where he designed and built much of the furniture for his house. The Hetzels were thoroughly involved with the community, her name appearing frequently on committees regarding entertainments in the Guild Hall, and he serving as secretary of the Rose Valley Association from 1903-1910 and secretary of the Folk from 1905 through 1910.

Sources: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1
Chronicles of the Folk and Minutes of the Rose Valley Association

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William Jervis Pot William Percival Jervis was a nationally known master potter.  He rented a studio in the Rose Valley Guild Hall. He created many highly praised pieces marked with the Rose Valley seal. He produced The Encyclopedia of Ceramics and wrote Rough Notes on Pottery, A Book of Pottery Marks and English Potters and American History.

He left his pottery shop in Rose Valley in 1904. 

Sources:
Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1
A Poor Sort of Heaven, A Good Sort of Earth: The Rose Valley Arts & Crafts Experiment; Exhibition Catalogue,
Brandywine River Museum, 1983.

William Jervis in his studio
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Nathan Kite Nathan (18??-1925) and Anna Price Kite (1866-1943) came to Rose Valley with the rest of the Price family in 1901, and were the innkeepers of the Rose Valley Guest House from 1903-1905. They painted signs and mottoes on wood in illuminated Gothic lettering. One such sign welcomed visitors to the Guest House.

Nathan Kite is best remembered for having written a first-hand account of the beginning of the Rose Valley community in a book he called the “Chronicles of the Folk”. He attended Haverford College, was a good cricket player and considered himself a farmer, planting a large orchard on their property at the end of Vernon Lane. When Rose Valley became a borough in 1923, Nathan Kite was it’s first burgess.

Anna Price Kite trained as a kindergarten teacher in Baltimore, then taught in West Philadelphia before moving to Rose Valley. She ran a kindergarten for 15 years at Good Intent, their home that she designed on Vernon Lane, and organized many community events, including Robin Hood plays on the lawn and Christmas caroling around the valley.

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

Nathan Kite (approximately 1910)
Anna Kite
Anna Margaret Kite (approximately 1930)
Photo taken by
Walter F. Price
David Lightfoot was a cousin of both the Prices and the Waltons, and started carving animals when he was a child. As an adult he made his living carving animals for carousels for the Philadelphia Toboggan Company. In 1902 he carved two bears to mark the entrance to the Furniture Shop on Old Mill Lane. Nathan Kite gives the following description:

“Now these bears have a somewhat interesting history, and on this wise it was. The bear posts were chestnut trees growing on Long Point to the west of the Rose Valley Shops. Two sturdy sons of toil, Wallie Geary and David Lightfoot, stripped them of bark and limbs and rolled them down to Ridley Creek. Then that Irish plug known as Shackleton’s Molly and old white faced Brownie were hitched up to a cart, Brownie between the shaves and Molly on the lead. The cart was now backed down over the end of one log and it was raised and chained to the axle tree of the cart. The two horses were then started and lo, Brownie started and Molly stood, then Molly started and Brownie stood: now this horse play continued a great while until the wrath of these sons of toil had risen to a great height. Then they changed the horses about, putting Molly in the cart and Brownie in the lead. Each man then provided himself with a woddle that would wear, and Geary took Brownie and Dave took Molly and they woddled those horses for full fifteen minutes; then Molly sat down in the shafts of the cart, placed her ears in a rearward slant and thus she sat.

The two men then conferred lovingly together and the result was that each one procured sand and poured it into the ears of the horses as fast as they shook it out; this treatment roused the Dutch in Brownie at a rapid rate, her wrath was plainly shown and soon took effect in that she pulled the cart, Molly and log up that bank and started for Media, at the 1st bridge the Irish in Molly got on and the two horses went on a run to the Media road where Dave stopped them. Brownie brought out the 2nd log all herself. The holes had already been dug, and the posts were soon stood up and after a deal [of] sighting were pronounced straight. The holes were filled in with dirt and rammed down.

Now it came to pass that every man who came that way pronounced those posts crooked, especially did Francis Day employ his leisure in telling Geary and Dave that those posts were crooked: then would Geary & Dave plant themselves in the middle of the road and would look through one eye and then another, and oft did they compare notes, and at the end Geary would remove a large quid of “Jolly tar” from his ponderous mouth and deliver with unction this judgement: “them posts is pretty dam strait” and this settled the matter until Day again appeared.

Now Dave was a hefty carver of wood; and at this time he lived in the small stone house just east of the Association’s property. Now in this house he fashioned the models of those same bears, working often times by candle light far into the night. When the model of one was finished he built himself a platform around the posts, and he cut and he cut and the bears grew and they grew until a gate way of real merit adorned the property.”

(Chronicles of the Folk, Dec. ‘03)

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

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Lightfoot Carving
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Maene Carving
John Maene was a nationally known carver in stone and wood.  He came to Rose Valley in 1902 to be the foreman and head carver for the Furniture Shop.  Many of his stone figures can be seen on buildings at Princeton, Wellesley, and the University of Pennsylvania. He carved the figures over the choir stalls at Valley Forge Chapel. His carvings were also at San Simion and the Traymore Hotel in Atlantic City, New Jersey.

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

Susan Price Susanna Martin Price (1853-1941) was the oldest of Will’s siblings, trained under Howard Stratton at the Pennsylvania Museum School. Her interest was in miniature paintings. She later taught art for 30 years at the Agnes Irwin School. She came to Rose Valley in the summer of 1901 to manage the Guest House for the artists who came with Howard Stratton in the first summer of the Rose Valley community. When the rest of the family arrived in October, she kept house for her mother and brother, Walter, in the old house on Peewee Hill above the Association houses.

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

Susan Price (about 1930) taken by Walter F. Price
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Walter Price Walter F. Price (1857-1951)  was an architect, scholar, watercolorist and photographer. He attended Westtown School and Friends Select and graduated from Haverford College in classical studies in 1881, receiving his master’s degree from Harvard in 1884. He was one of the founders of the Haverford School, where he taught classics for seven years.

After several trips to Europe, Price became so enamored by European architecture, and particularly Italian, that he switched careers, joining his two brothers, Frank L. and William L. Price, in their firm for nearly 10 years. In 1902 he launched his own career with work for Haverford College and speculative housing design for the developer Milton W. Young, primarily in the new Overbrook section of Philadelphia. He was in partnership with his cousin, William McKee Walton, from 1923-1935, during which time he became known as an authority on Friends’ meetinghouses. He designed the meetinghouse for Westtown School, which led to the firm’s commission for the Florida Avenue Meeting in Washington, D.C. During his career he designed numerous houses in the Philadelphia area. His institutional work included three hotels in Atlantic City, the Phillips Memorial at West Chester State College, several buildings at Haverford and the Alumnae Hall at Mt. Holyoke College. He joined the T-Square Club in 1892 and was a member of the AIA.

Walter Price arrived in Rose Valley with the rest of the Prices in 190l. Having lived some years in Wallingford as a boy, he was familiar with the area and made many watercolors of local sights. He was a photographer by avocation, and in 1902 the Rose Valley Folk asked him to record changes being wrought in the new community. In 1906 he married Felicia Thomas and bought the pre-existing farmhouse on the corner of Price’s Lane. Using plaster, tile and the addition of a pergola, he remodeled it into a house harmonious with both his brother Will’s Rose Valley architecture and the Italian style that had so impressed him. It became the prototype for the house he designed for his family in Moylan and for which they left Rose Valley in 1916. His interest in art and photography resulted in an extensive library of books which he bound by hand, a craft he picked up in Rose Valley and practiced for the rest of his life.

Sources: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1
Price Family Papers
Biographical Dictionary of Philadelphia Architects
Chronicles of the Folk, June 1902

Walter Price Door Plaque
Door to home office in Moylan.
Walter Price Design
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William Lightfoot Price,1861 - 1916, was a nationally known architect, artist, actor, writer and visionary,
and Founder of Rose Valley Arts and Crafts Colony  

He came to Rose Valley in 1901 to establish his arts and crafts community there.  Previously he had founded a single tax community of Arden, Delaware. When he came to Rose Valley, he persuaded wealthy friends to finance him, and he brought along fifty or more family members and friends. 

He was also an artists, painting in oil and watercolor. He did many of the drawings for “The Artsman” and also designed scenery, posters, and programs for the Rose Valley theatricals.

For more information on Price’s architectural achievements, see William L. Price:  Arts and Crafts to Modern Design by George E. Thomas (copyright 2000, Published by Princeton Architectural Press)
William Lightfoot Price
William Price Architectural Design
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Louis Smith Roberts was an illustrator.  She came to Rose Valley in 1910 as a guest of her friend, Emma Troth. She married William Roberts, and they set up a shop designing and printing greeting cards. Will Roberts succeeded Carl deMoll in the book bindery in Guild Hall. An advertisement for The Roberts Press can be found in “The Artsman” of 1906. Louise Roberts’ designs were so charming that they were used until very recently by the Abel Press. At the same time, she continued as an illustrator for books and magazines.

Source:
Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

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Alice Barber Stephens (1858-1932)

Alice Barber Stephens studied art at the School of Design for Women (now Moore College of Art) and at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts where she was a member of the first class that admitted women, which was taught by Thomas Eakins. She also studied at the Academie Julian in Paris.

She married Charles H. Stephens in 1890 and in 1897, she helped found the Plastic Club, which was an art club for women that met at the Philadelphia School of Design. By 1904 when she and her husband moved to Rose Valley, she was a nationally acclaimed illustrator. Their house and studios, “Thunderbird Lodge” had been a bank barn that was converted for them by Will Price.

Sources:
Encyclopedia Britannica “Women In American History”
A History of the Plastic Club
History of Rose Valley, Vol.1
Brandywine River Museum, Catalogue of the Collection, p.103

Alice Stephens Illustration
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Charles Stephens (1864-1940) was a teacher, photographer, illustrator, and one of America’s foremost authorities on Indians.  His father was Henry Lewis Stephens (1824-1882), an artist and photographer in the early American West.  Charles H. Stephens was a cousin of Frank Stephens of Arden, the first arts and crafts colony experiment attempted by William Lightfoot Price.   

His work with the Blackfeet Indian Reservation in Montana is probably his greatest achievement. From 1893 through 1930, Charles H. Stephens collected more than 100 Blackfeet artifacts and related material. In 1891, he spent three months living with the Blackfeet tribe.  He photographed their daily life, and kept a journal of sketches detailing artifacts, rituals, and individual sketches. It is an impressive collection, revealing early life on the Reservation. Named the Charles H. Stephens Collection, it is now housed at the University of Pennsylvania Museum.

When Stephens and his wife, Alice Barber Stephens, settled in Rose Valley, William Lightfoot Price added two studios to a barn and renovated the space especially for them.  It was and still is called Thunderbird Lodge.  The fireplace in the upper studio was built in the shape of a Thunderbird, reflecting Charles Stephens’ interest in Indians. On the exterior of the house is a beautifully executed representation in Mercer tile of the same Indian symbol.

Source:
History of Rose Valley, vol. 1
University of Pennsylvania Museum Pre-Columbian.org/talk

Charles Stephens in Thunderbird Lodge
Charles Stephens in his studio at Thundebird Lodge
Thunderbird Lodge
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Thunderbird Lodge
Howard Freemont Stratton was the director of the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Art (now PAFA), ran a summer school in Rose Valley in 1901, along with his former students Susan Price, Mary Price deMoll and Carl deMoll. Also numbered among his former students were Will Price, Henry Troth and John Bissegger. Stratton was an educator. He was the head of The Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Arts (PMSIA).  It is probable that his role at PMSIA helped develop Will Walton and Samuel Yellin’s interest in Rose Valley.

Howard Stratton wrote some of the early minutes of the Rose Valley Folk. Stratton, John O. Gilmore, M. Hawley McLanahan, Edward Bok, and William Lightfoot Price founded the Rose Valley Association.

Source: Exhibition of Rose Valley Art and Handicrafts 2001
History of Rose Valley, vol.1

Henry Troth  was a nationally known photographer.  He came to Rose Valley in the early 1900’s, and built a summer home on Price’s Lane for him and his sister, Emma Troth. Emma was an artist, mainly an illustrator, who shared a studio with a young woman named Louise Smith.

Troth was a pictorialist, a name given to those photographers in the late 19th and early 20th centuries interested in creative artistic expression. For them, photographic sharpness and clarity were to be avoided. Their photographs often had a soft tranquil quality.

Troth displayed his work along with other noted photographers including F. Holland Day, at the 1896 Washington Salon. In 1899, he, Day, Frances Benjamin Johnston, Clarence White, and Gertrude Kasebier were selected to be judges at the Second Philadelphia Photographic Salon.

His work is in collection at the George Eastman House.

Source:
History of Rose Valley, vol. 1
Americanhistory.si.edu

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Horace Traubel Horace Logo Traubel  (1858 -1919) was a nationally known writer, poet, journalist, editor and publisher.  He was born and raised in Camden, New Jersey.  He left school at the age of 12 and went into the newspaper business, where he learned printing and became a typesetter. At the age of 16, he was the head of the printing office for the Camden Evening Visitor. He came to Philadelphia to work for his father’s lithography shop, and also held other positions in the print industry. 

He is best known for his apostolic friendship with Walt Whitman and the nine volume biography about the poet which he authored, Walt Whitman in Camden. He was one of Whitman’s three literary executors and founded”The Conservator,” a journal dedicated to keeping the work of Whitman alive.

He married his wife, Anne Montgomerie, in Whitman’s home in 1891. They had two children, Gertrude and Wallace. Wallace died at the age of 6 of scarlet fever. Anne became an associate editor of “The Conservator,” and Gertrude was a staff member as a teenager.

He, Anne and Gertrude came to Rose Valley and stayed at the Guest House, which, under the management of Nathan and Anna Kite, served as an Inn for visitors to the community. He was enchanted with the utopian nature of the community, and returned to Philadelphia to establish the Rose Valley Print Shop. From 1903 to 1907, that shop published a monthly magazine called “The Artsman,” subtitled, “The Art That Is Life.”  Three individuals are listed as editors: William Lightfoot Price, M. Hawley McLanahan, and Horace Traubel, but it is probable that Traubel did most of the editing.

Source: History of Rose Valley, vol.1

Photograph taken by Henry Troth
The Artsman
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Herbert Lightfoot Walton (1885-1938) was a versatile artist.  He painted in oil, was a stonemason, sculpted, and was an iron craftsman and a builder.  

His mother was Mary Rhodes Norton and his father was Charles Joseph Walton. They were direct descendents of  Thomas Walton, a Quaker, who at the age of twenty five with his three brothers came from England and settled in Byberry Pennsylvania, fifty miles or so up the Delaware from Philadelphia. The Waltons were related to both the Kite and Price families through marriage.

Mary “Mother” Walton had six boys one of whom, Dwight, drowned in a swimming accident when they lived  in Philadelphia.  When their father died in 1893 at the age of 42, the Walton family moved to Washington, Iowa to live with Mary Walton’s sister and her husband. Herbert left Iowa in 1903 to join his older brother William McKee Walton  in Rose Valley and attend the Pennsylvania Museum School of Industrial Arts.  Charles, his son, said “When I went to that same school 35 years later, two of the teachers remembered my father with fondness.”

In Rose Valley, Herbert lived with Aunty Bess Warrington in a bungalow that was the second house from the corner of Price’s Lane and Rose Valley Road until he was married in 1914.  After he was married, Hub (or Herb) built a house right next door to brother Will on Price’s Lane. The two went to Europe and the West Indies together and were the best of friends.

Herbert also participated in Hedgerow theater and in the Rose Valley Chorus.  He played Androcles against Jasper Deeter’s lion. And then they would switch roles. He also was Mr. Pim. in Mr. Pim Passes By.

Herbert Walton built houses for a variety of architects, and sometimes used his own plans. He had an artistic touch that led him to select all his own materials - wood, stone, roof slates or tiles. He was chosen by William Price to build the five houses on the hill in Rose Valley that were designed by Price and commissioned by Charles T. Schoen (Porter Lane.)  In his forge on Price’s Lane, he forged beautiful fireplace tools and screens, lamps, tables, and decorative articles. His best known works, still seen today, are the Rose Valley street signs and the lamps at Hedgerow Theatre.

Charles (his son) remembers, “My father built a workshop/studio next to his house. He had a forge in the studio and on Sunday mornings you could hear him banging away on a piece of iron to make a fire place tool or an iron dragon. He painted in the upper room of his studio. During the depression gold was confiscated by the government. In protest he bought some gold leaf and covered his picture frames with patches of gold.  He died in 1938 in Rose Valley at the age of 54 from a heart condition.”

Source: The Hedgerow Theatre: An Historical Study, J.C.Wentz, 1970
History of Rose Valley, vol.1
Comments from Charles Walton (son of Herbert Walton) in 2003

Walton Lamp
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William McKee Walton  (1879-1950)  was an architect, furniture designer, watercolorist and musician. He was the second of six boys born to Charles and Mary Norton Walton of Philadelphia. At the death of Charles in 1893, Mary Walton took her surviving five sons to be raised with her family in Iowa until age 18, at which time they were sent, each in turn, back to Philadelphia to continue their studies, chaperoned by their aunt, Elizabeth Warrington, and under the watchful eyes of their older cousins, Walter and Will Price. Will attended the Pennsylvania Museum and School of Industrial Arts and apprenticed in the architectural firm of Price and Price. After college, Will joined  Price and McLanahan. At the death of Will Price in 1916, Will Walton moved over to his uncle Walter’s practice, and in 1923 became a full partner in the firm of Price and Walton. He was a member of the AIA from 1927 to 1948.  

Will Walton was a central figure in the Rose Valley community for 50 years, eventually becoming known as “Pop” to everyone. When cousin Will and the rest of the Prices and their extended family came to Rose Valley in 1901, Will Walton came with them to help design furniture. From 1901-1903 he lived in the Guest House with Auntie Bess and painted many early scenes of the Valley, some of which were made into postcards. In 1903 he and Auntie Bess moved to her new cottage on Price’s Lane. He designed posters and programs for events at the Guild Hall, and created scenery for the dramatic productions. He started a Women’s Chorus in 1905, and was a founding member of the Rose Valley Chorus in 1907, serving as it’s musical director for many years later on.  

In 1912 he married Rose Avery and built a cottage next door to Auntie Bess, who by this time had seen the four other Walton brothers - Herbert, Percy, Sam and Joe - at one time or another camping on her sofa. Rose, who had studied at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts with Hugh Breckenridge, was a talented portrait artist in her own right. She was also an invaluable asset to the dramatic productions at Guild Hall, sewing scores of costumes “late into the night”.
William Walton Sketch
Interior Sketch of Aunt Bess’ by William Walton
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The Rose Valley Museum & Historical Society